Early detection is key to treating cancer. When cancer is caught early, it’s less likely to spread, and treatments are more likely to be effective and may be treated with less invasive options. 

A variety of cancer screenings based on gender, age and other risk factors are available through UofL Health, supported by the Brown Cancer Center. See the full list below.

Mammogram screening for breast cancer

Schedule a mammogram at UofL Health by calling 502-681-1405. Mammograms are available at the following UofL Health facilities:

Screening guidelines

  • According to the American Cancer Society, women should talk with their doctor to determine their risk for breast cancer. Women should also know how their breasts normally feel and report any changes to their doctor.
  • For women younger than 40 with risk factors, talk to your physician to determine when mammogram screening should begin.
  • Women between ages 40-44 with an average risk have the option to start screening with a mammogram every year.
  • Women ages 45-54 should get mammograms every year.
  • Women 55 and older can switch to getting mammograms every two years or may continue with annual mammograms. Screening should continue as long as a woman is in good health and is expected to live at least 10 more years.

Lung cancer screening

To determine eligibility for a low-dose CT lung cancer screening, call Brown Cancer Center's Lung Screening Program at 502-210-4497.

Screenings are available at the following UofL Health locations:

Screening guidelines

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults aged 50 to 80 years who have a 20 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

Screening should be discontinued once a person has not smoked for 15 years or develops a health problem that substantially limits life expectancy or the ability or willingness to have curative lung surgery.

Colorectal cancer screening

Talk to your primary care physician about colorectal screening. To make an appointment with a primary care provider at UofL Health, call 502-588-4343. If a colonoscopy is recommended, a number of UofL Physicians practices offer this. A full list can be found by clicking here.

Screening guidelines

The USPSTF recommends screening for colorectal cancer in all adults aged 45 to 75 years.

For patients ages 76 to 85, talk to your provider about whether or not screening is recommended. Your provider will consider your overall health, prior screening history and preferences.

Screening should be done by ONE of the following:

  1. Annually, have a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). If the physician finds blood in your stool, you may need a colonoscopy.
  2. Every five years, have a virtual colonoscopy, also called Computed Tomographic (CT) Colonography. A colonoscopy will be performed if polyps are found.
  3. Every 10 years, have a colonoscopy performed if not at high risk.

Cervical cancer screening

Your primary care provider or gynecologist can perform a cervical cancer screening during your annual check-up.

To schedule an appointment with UofL Physicians -- OB/GYN & Women's Health, call 502-588-4400.

Call 502-588-4343 to schedule an appointment with a UofL Physicians - Primary Care provider.

Screening guidelines

  • The USPSTF recommends screening for cervical cancer every three years with cervical cytology (also called a Pap test or Pap smear) alone in women age 21-29.
  • For women age 30-65, the USPSTF recommends screening every three years with cervical cytology alone, every five years with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing alone, or every five years with hrHPV testing in combination with cytology (cotesting).

Prostate cancer screening

Call UofL Physicians - Urology at 502-588-4740 or talk to your primary care physician to schedule your screening. To make an appointment with UofL Physicians - Primary Care provider, call 502-588-4343.

Screening guidelines

  • According to the American Cancer Society, men should talk with their doctor about when to begin screening for prostate cancer.
  • For those with a higher risk - those with more than one first-degree relative (father or brother) who had prostate cancer at an early age - the discussion should start at age 40.
  • For those with a moderately high risk - including African-Americans and men with a first-degree relative diagnosed younger than age 65 - the discussion should start at age 45.
  • For those with average risk and expected to live at least 10 more years - the discussion should start at age 50.
  • If you decide to be tested, you should get a PSA blood test with or without a rectal exam. How often you're tested will depend on your PSA level.

Skin cancer screening

Talk to your primary care physician or dermatologist to schedule your skin cancer screening. Call the UofL Physicians - Primary Care Hotline at 502-588-4343 to find a primary care provider at UofL Health.

Screening guidelines

An annual skin exam is recommended for all ages and is highly recommended for those with increased sun exposure. Self-examine your skin monthly. Use sunscreen and sun-protective clothing, and avoid tanning beds.

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